Posts tagged Fat Tuesday



Mardi Gras 2016 was fantastic, it was exciting, it was downright thrilling at times. Of course, I’m a Mardi Gras freak. It was a very short season, ending on February 9. Next year, Fat Tuesday is more than 2 1/2 weeks later.

I want to thank my sweet girlfriend Sue and my good friend Billy, both Mardi Gras freaks without whom the entire season wouldn’t have been nearly as much fun. Billy lives a block from St. Charles Avenue so his house was parade central and I went to virtually all my parades with Sue.

The season began for me with my own Krewe du Vieux, which rolled January 23. It was a terrific parade and the ball was fantastic, with none other than Texas guitar legend and ZZ Top front man Billy Gibbons on guitar and vocals along with Walter Wolfman Washington and George Porter, Jr. The ball was held in the Civic and it’s a pretty nice party forum compared to some of the more sorry auditoriums KdV has used in their recent past.


ZZ Top Guitarist and Lead Vocalist Billy Gibbons

ZZ Top Guitarist and Lead Vocalist Billy Gibbons Burned Down the Civic!


New Thoth Throw - The Thoth Fedora!

New Thoth Throw – The Thoth Fedora!


I caught a couple of newish throws, the Thoth Fedora and the NYX Earbuds.


NYX Earbuds

NYX Earbuds


When Fat Tuesday was only a couple of hours past sunrise, I was on Jackson Avenue below Dryades for Zulu. I was wearing my purple, green and gold silk scarf, my purple reversible satin cape from, my gold half mask, and my newly acquired Mardi Gras furry leggings. I bought the leggings Fat Tuesday morning on the Zulu parade route from a shopping cart vendor.

Bands play a big role in parades, the best bands generally are from local high school and surrounding colleges. Out of town bands perform in many parades toward the end of each season, as local high schools are limited to seven parades per season. Bands have been part of Mardi Gras processions and parades since the very beginning. Bands cost the krewes a lot more money post Katrina. Before the storm, parade band fees ran $1,000-$1,500 per parade. After Katrina, the bands ask for and get $3,500 or more. Bands are in demand for more than one reason. They add the beat and the funk, essential elements of parades. The New Orleans City Council has mandated that all Orleans parish parades have 7 bands. My own Krewe du Vieux has around 20 brass bands participate in the parade.

Year after year, the best high school band is the St. Augustine Marching 100, and the best college band is the Southern University Jaguar Band. Other notable bands in 2016 include the Landry Walker High School Band and the Texas Southern Ocean of Soul.

Some of the best looking floats all year were in the Proteus parade. Royal Artists create this parade, and it’s the best work they do by far.

Proteus Blue Halo

Proteus Blue Halo Float


I ended up in the French Quarter at Molly’s at the Market on Decatur around noon Fat Tuesday, to meet the Perv Patrol, my girlfriend’s Sue’s themed costume group. It was the first time in decades I missed REX which was my choice after deciding to see all of ZULU for the first time in as long. ZULU had a long break near the beginning that was over 30 minutes long and set the parade back big time. We ran into the Krewe of Cosmic Debris which had come down Decatur Street just as I arrived. Molly’s is one of their stops so I had a really hard time getting a drink when the krewe invaded the bar. I went down the street to an adjacent bar and bought a double and returned to Molly’s.

Molly's Costumers

Molly’s Costumers


Mardi Gras Revelers

Mardi Gras Revelers


Molly's Revelers 2

Molly’s Revelers 2


Molly's Reveler's 3

Molly’s Revelers 3


Krewe of Cosmic Debris

Krewe of Cosmic Debris


Molly's Revelers 4

Molly’s Revelers 4


Marine Band during ZULU

Marine Band during ZULU












Little Known Mardi Gras Facts!!


1. Floats mounted on St. Charles Avenue streetcars? The 1900 Nereus parade tried the idea, but the experience was deemed a failure and the club gave up parading soon after. They still hold a yearly ball, however. The Phunny Phorty Phellows decorate a streetcar for their Twelfth Night ride each year, but they don’t decorate the car exterior much, and they don’t mount a float onto a streetcar.

Phunny Phorty Phellows in Action on Twelfth Night!!

Phunny Phorty Phellows in Action on Twelfth Night!!

2. Many krewes rent their floats, signing three to five year contacts with the float builder.

3. Not all doubloons are made from aluminum. Many krewes mint fancier ones out of more expensive metals -silver, gold, copper, brass, etc.- that are sometimes designed and painted in Europe. These doubloons are kept by the krewe members or given as krewe favors or gifts.

4. Early New Orleans parades (1860s) were built partially in Paris and finished in New Orleans. The first parade constructed entirely in New Orleans was Comus 1873, entitled Missing Links to Darwin’s Origin of the Species, built by George Soulé. The Missing Links parade was an important event in New Orleans’ Mardi Gras history, becoming one of the first major parades to use satire and political commentary. Many of the images depict figures related to the Civil War and Reconstruction, such as Ulysses S. Grant, Benjamin Butler, and Louisiana Governor Henry Warmoth. Also depicted are notable figures such as Charles Darwin, and Algernon Badger (head of the despised Metropolitan Police).

1873 Comus Parade - Missing Links

1873 Comus Parade – Missing Links

5. The first recorded throw was in 1871; a Twelfth Night Reveler, masked as Santa Claus, tossed small gifts to the parade crowd.

6. How much of a king is Rex, King of Carnival? In 1950, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor attended the Rex ball and found themselves face to face to face with the pretend only royalty, the King and Queen of Rex. Guess which couple did the bowing? The gracious Windsors!

7. How is the date for Mardi Gras determined? This year, the date is February 12, but any Tuesday from February 3 to March 9 could be the one. The rule is: Mardi Gras is always 46 days before Easter, which is always the first Sunday after the full moon following the Spring Equinox. When is the Spring Equinox? It’s the day when the sun crosses the plane of the earth’s equator, making day and night all over the earth the same length. Since this date shifts, Easter changes, which is why the date of Mardi Gras is moveable.

8. 1899 was the year of the Big Snow. There were big chunks of ice in the Mississippi River during the final weekend before Fat Tuesday.

Fat Tuesday Arrives – Happy Mardi Gras to the WORLD!!!

King of Carnival Having Fun!!

King of Carnival Rex

After a wild final weekend, the big day is here!! Get out there and enjoy the zillion events, the weather is perfect.

I know a lot of folks who avoid Zulu, Rex and the trucks. It seems to me that Krewe of St. Anne in the Marigny is more popular than ever. My friends are flocking to the informal costume oriented event.

Krewe of St. Anne Revelers

Krewe of St. Anne Revelers

Others hang with the historic Mardi Gras Indians, from downtown to uptown. I remember the year of the police strike – I spent some time with the Wild Tchoupitoulas when Chief Jolly, Norman Bell, and the Neville Brothers were in the group. I remember sharing a joint with Aaron Neville that day. It was really enjoyable.

The Back Street Museum is a popular destination on Mardi Gras Day.

I’ve always been a parade person, but I may, someday soon, join one of the many walking parades and experience Mardi Gras Day this way. Time will only tell.

Once again, Happy Mardi to all- however you experience it- have a ball!! I hope to see YOU at the Mardi Gras!!

Mardi Gras Day Dates


The date of Fat Tuesday is dependent on that of Easter, a movable feast based on the cycles of the moon. The date can vary from as early as 3 February to as late as 9 March, making 2011 the 2nd latest date possible. The date of Easter is based on the Spring Equinox.

Spring Equinox 2011

Spring Equinox 2011

Mardi Gras Day (Shrove Tuesday, Fat Tuesday) will occur on the following dates in coming years, 2038 is the latest date possible, March 9.

  • 2011 — 8 March
  • 2012 — 21 February
  • 2013 — 12 February
  • 2014 — 4 March
  • 2015 — 17 February
  • 2016 — 9 February
  • 2017 — 28 February
  • 2018 — 13 February
  • 2019 — 5 March
  • 2020 — 25 February
  • 2021 — 16 February
  • 2022 — 1 March
  • 2023 — 21 February
  • 2024 — 13 February
  • 2025 — 4 March
  • 2026 — 17 February
  • 2027 — 9 February
  • 2028 — 29 February
  • 2029 — 13 February
  • 2030 — 5 March
  • 2031 — 25 February
  • 2032 — 10 February
  • 2033 — 1 March
  • 2034 — 21 February
  • 2035 — 6 February
  • 2036 — 26 February
  • 2037 — 17 February
  • 2038 — 9 March
  • 2039 — 22 February
  • 2040 — 14 February
  • 2041 — 5 March
  • 2042 — 18 February
  • 2043 — 10 February
  • 2044 — 1 March
  • 2045 — 21 February
  • 2046 — 6 February
  • 2047 — 26 February
  • 2048 — 18 February
  • 2049 — 2 March
  • 2050 — 22 February

Chilly Carnival Season Forecast


February 2010 Blizzard up North Brrrr!!

The Northeast USA has gotten a lot of snow again, and eventually that cold air finds its way to the deep South. The next week will be frigid in New Orleans, and that means a COLD Mardi Gras.  Here’s a link to the National Weather Service Forecast Office Baton Rouge/New Orleans Mardi Gras Climatology Chart. It’s a pretty nifty chart, with a lot of good condensed data about weather trends on Fat Tuesday. This year Fat Tuesday is February 16, 2010. For the big Second Carnival Weekend, February 13 & 14, nights in the 30s and days in the 50s are forecast.

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